6 Responses

  1. Stian Håklev
    Stian Håklev June 9, 2010 at 9:08 pm | | Reply

    Hi Nate, good to hear from you! What are you up to these days?

    Good overview over DIY U. It seems to be a book that really get’s some people riled up. I agree with many of the criticisms, although I still found it to be a very helpful book, especially for many who have no idea any of this even exists.

    The Ginandtacos quote is quite ridiculous (“No one who has taken or taught one can claim in earnest to have learned more than they do in traditional courses. Few could honestly claim that they learned anything at all. …”)… Well, in fact Sir, I actually learnt more in my 15 week intro to open ed with David Wiley, than I learnt in almost all my undergrad classes at Uni of Toronto, the most “prestigious” university in Canada! And that was even an open ed class.

    I also recognize many of your experiences from undergrad (and sometimes from grad school too in fact, here we have more time to discuss, we spend more time preparing, there are smaller classes, etc – but unless the instructor is good, sometimes we just seem to be throwing out a bunch of quick observation, and then moving on to the next thing. One of the best classes I have ever taken was with Marlene Scardamalia, using the Knowledge Building model I talk about in my presentation, which impressed me a lot).

    And yes – absolutely agree about all the stuff we generate during undergrad, that is just filed away and not available or useful to anyone… Such a waste! (Yet many people are really reluctant to open stuff up – even in grad school now, especially teacher candidates… They don’t want a future employer to google them, and see their first fledgling ideas about teaching).

    And BTW: Surprised and happy to see a reference to my own presentation in your blog post, which I posted online little more than 24 hours ago! In a way, that proves your point about informal learning networks, compared to traditional methods. If I had handed it in for a class, I’d have gotten a few sentences back after three weeks. Now I got feedback from several professors and professionals, within hours. (But as I said in the talk, that’s also because I’ve been cultivating my network for several years – it’s not necessarily easy to get there for beginners, and it’s something we have to be cognizant of!)

    Stian

  2. Stian Håklev
    Stian Håklev June 9, 2010 at 9:08 pm | | Reply

    Hi Nate, good to hear from you! What are you up to these days?

    Good overview over DIY U. It seems to be a book that really get’s some people riled up. I agree with many of the criticisms, although I still found it to be a very helpful book, especially for many who have no idea any of this even exists.

    The Ginandtacos quote is quite ridiculous (“No one who has taken or taught one can claim in earnest to have learned more than they do in traditional courses. Few could honestly claim that they learned anything at all. …”)… Well, in fact Sir, I actually learnt more in my 15 week intro to open ed with David Wiley, than I learnt in almost all my undergrad classes at Uni of Toronto, the most “prestigious” university in Canada! And that was even an open ed class.

    I also recognize many of your experiences from undergrad (and sometimes from grad school too in fact, here we have more time to discuss, we spend more time preparing, there are smaller classes, etc – but unless the instructor is good, sometimes we just seem to be throwing out a bunch of quick observation, and then moving on to the next thing. One of the best classes I have ever taken was with Marlene Scardamalia, using the Knowledge Building model I talk about in my presentation, which impressed me a lot).

    And yes – absolutely agree about all the stuff we generate during undergrad, that is just filed away and not available or useful to anyone… Such a waste! (Yet many people are really reluctant to open stuff up – even in grad school now, especially teacher candidates… They don’t want a future employer to google them, and see their first fledgling ideas about teaching).

    And BTW: Surprised and happy to see a reference to my own presentation in your blog post, which I posted online little more than 24 hours ago! In a way, that proves your point about informal learning networks, compared to traditional methods. If I had handed it in for a class, I’d have gotten a few sentences back after three weeks. Now I got feedback from several professors and professionals, within hours. (But as I said in the talk, that’s also because I’ve been cultivating my network for several years – it’s not necessarily easy to get there for beginners, and it’s something we have to be cognizant of!)

    Stian

  3. Stian Håklev
    Stian Håklev June 9, 2010 at 10:18 pm | | Reply

    In fact, I’m about to write a longer reply to George Siemens on this, at the IDC discussion on the future of learning (https://lists.thing.net/pipermail/idc/2010-June/004310.html). I had the same experience, there was an “overflow” online component for a class I took, basically we paid exactly the same as the others, and instead of going to class (with 300 others), we got to sit at home and watch tiny little postage-stamp sized videos, two hour long, of the entire lecture (mostly consisting of jokes, and stories about his field research fifty years ago). Then there were two exams, both multiple choice! There was no discussion forum, no way of interacting at all with others in the class…

    So yeah, sure, if you think that’s distance ed, then I can understand your point of view. And one of the problems is that right now, universities are mainly evaluated and ranked based on research… Or even exclusivity, how many applicants can we reject. So even though I might have had a much better experience with Athabasca, or Open University UK (or even Phoenix U to be honest), that credit from UofT obviously looks much better on a transcript!

  4. Stian Håklev
    Stian Håklev June 9, 2010 at 10:18 pm | | Reply

    In fact, I’m about to write a longer reply to George Siemens on this, at the IDC discussion on the future of learning (https://lists.thing.net/pipermail/idc/2010-June/004310.html). I had the same experience, there was an “overflow” online component for a class I took, basically we paid exactly the same as the others, and instead of going to class (with 300 others), we got to sit at home and watch tiny little postage-stamp sized videos, two hour long, of the entire lecture (mostly consisting of jokes, and stories about his field research fifty years ago). Then there were two exams, both multiple choice! There was no discussion forum, no way of interacting at all with others in the class…

    So yeah, sure, if you think that’s distance ed, then I can understand your point of view. And one of the problems is that right now, universities are mainly evaluated and ranked based on research… Or even exclusivity, how many applicants can we reject. So even though I might have had a much better experience with Athabasca, or Open University UK (or even Phoenix U to be honest), that credit from UofT obviously looks much better on a transcript!

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